WordPress 2.1 on the move

Matthew Mullenweg announced at Wordpress.org that WordPress 2.1 "Ella" is available for download. Some of the new features and changes listed in this version of WordPress that I think users will like include:

  • Autosave makes sure you never lose a post again. I'm a habitual browser closer before saving my work...so this will be a big one for for me!
  • A tabbed editor that allows you to switch between WYSIWYG and code editing instantly while writing a post.
  • The lossless XML import and export makes it easy for you to move your content between WordPress blogs.
  • You can set any “page” to be the front page of your site, and put the latest posts somewhere else, making it much easier to use WordPress as a content management system.
  • Much more efficient database code, faster than previous versions. Domas Mituzas from MySQL went over all our queries with a fine-toothed comb.
  • Pages can now be drafts, or private.
  • Comment feeds now include all the comments, not just the last 10.
  • A new version of the Akismet plugin is bundled.

Plone 2.5.2 released

I almost missed this one. Plone 2.5.2 was released a few days ago. Plone is a CMS written in Python (something I know a lot about) that is built on the Zope application server (something I know very little about). The Plone 2.5.2 release is a bug fixer for the following:

  • LiveSearch
  • Unicode handling
  • External Editor
  • IE7 rendering

The original announcement from Plone.org can be read here.

SeaMonkey 1.1 Released

SeaMonkey, the Internet suite package formerly known as Mozilla Suite, was just released under version 1.1.  SeaMonkey is like the old friend that you don't call anymore because  you're too "busy" spending time with your new friends, Firefox and Thunderbird.  Yet you still wish that old friend the best of luck and perhaps it's time for a reunion of sorts.

Lorelle on WP: Glimpses of WordPress 2.1

This just goes to show you how small of a world it is. Traffic to CMS Report is usually rather light over the weekend, but I noticed an increase in the number of people visiting the site Saturday and Sunday. These "new" visitors were coming from Lorelle VanFossen's WordPress blog. She recently posted an article on some of the features expected in the yet to be released WordPress 2.1.

Are certification programs a scam?

I have never really worried whether I was certified or not. This Computerworld article gets right to the point:

Depending on whom you talk to, certification programs are either borderline rip-offs that provide little useful knowledge, or valuable hiring tools that make it easier for IT execs to pick the most promising new employees.

Available from vendors focusing on their own products, or outside organizations offering multi-vendor training, these certificate programs are expanding to fill the many specialized technology subsets that have multiplied along with the growth of data storage and other IT areas.

Now this isn't to say that I don't have a few IT certifications under the belt and didn't receive some benefit from them. One of the most intensive IT certifications of recent years was in IT security and another to "please" the crowd was a certification for migration to Microsoft's Server 2003. By the time I was done with those certifications though, I didn't know enough to get the job done.